Posts Tagged ‘furnace’

Your Fall Furnace Maintenance Checklist

Monday, October 14th, 2019

heating-repair-optionsYour mind has probably switched its focus from your air conditioner to your furnace. It makes sense as you are more likely to turn on your heater in the recent lower temperatures Oregon City has been experiencing since the arrival of the fall season.

But when you go to switch on the heat, do you hesitate because you aren’t sure about when the last time was your heating system was checked? Honestly we wish that more people did, because it could save them a lot of time, money and warmth in the colder days to come!

It’s advisable to take the time to do a thorough check-up on your furnace long before you ever turn it on. If you have already begun using this system, don’t worry. It isn’t too late to make time to give your heater a once over.

If you aren’t sure what you should be looking for, we have provided you with a checklist of what to examine and look for. If you notice an issue with your system however, we urge you to call a professional for help.

(more…)

What a Furnace Upgrade Means for You

Monday, September 30th, 2019

Furnaces are deceptively simple. Many homeowners imagine furnaces like they used to be in picture books: a big old iron box that you throw oil or wood into with great pipes that lead through the ceiling. Most furnaces are not like that. They’re complicated machines that function using gas or electric burners, constantly cycling through fuel to heat the air through your home.

So, if your furnace resembles the clunky iron box in a children’s book, then you might want to consider purchasing an upgrade before you’re stuck looking into furnace repair in Gresham, OR. These systems become more efficient, safer, and comfortable every year. You’re honestly missing out by forgetting that. (more…)

What’s the Difference Between a Furnace and a Boiler?

Friday, May 27th, 2011

When it comes time to choose a new heating system for your home, there is a good chance your choices are limited. Most homes already have either forced air or radiant heat equipment installed so choosing something different would be costly and unnecessary. But, if you have a choice or are moving into a new home, here are some things to consider regarding the difference between furnaces and boilers.

What a Furnace Does

A furnace uses a fuel like gas, oil or electricity to heat a series of coils in the device. The furnace then uses a blower to push air across the heated coil and into an air handler where it can be distributed throughout your home. This is called a forced air system and requires a combination of ducts and filters to keep air moving smoothly and cleanly throughout your home.

If you have access to gas, a gas furnace with an AFUE of 90% or higher is one of the most efficient and cost effective ways to heat your home. These furnaces can also last upwards of 20-25 years with proper maintenance.

What a Boiler Does

A boiler is different in that it uses water as the heat carrying medium, not air. Boilers still need gas, oil or electricity to heat up the water in the system, though they often use less of it than a traditional furnace – depending on the age of the furnace and the boiler. After water is heated in the boiler, your radiant heating system carries the water to baseboard heaters or radiators throughout your home. This form of heat is preferred by many because it doesn’t require ductwork (which requires extra maintenance) or extra air filtering and it is more humidity friendly in a large home.

In terms of efficiency, both boilers and furnaces are efficient if you’re buying a new model. Capacity is also evenly matched. Boilers take the edge in comfort level and if you have the budget, you can install radiant floor heating which allows you to pipe hot water directly into bathroom floors or your living space so that you never again need to walk on cold floors. Another benefit of radiant heating is that the system will hold heat much longer and then release it over time instead of turning on and off a lot as a furnace tends to do.