Posts Tagged ‘Furnace Repair’

3 Myths About Furnace Efficiency

Monday, October 1st, 2018

gas-furnaceIt’s finally that time of year. Temperatures are steadily dropping, we’ve shut off our air conditioners, and soon we’ll be running our heaters not just at night, but in the daytime too. And every year, we get countless questions about these two things: How to get the most out of their heater, and how to pay the least in operational costs.

The problem is when that need leads to some serious misconceptions about how heating works. We can’t blame you for wanting to reduce your heating costs, but some of these ideas can do the opposite of what you want.

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3 Common Furnace Repairs

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Since furnaces are the most common kind of heating system in the country, they also happen to have the most common heating problems. This isn’t to say that furnaces experience a greater incidence of problems, simply that furnace problems are the most common by virtue of the systems’ popularity. With that popularity in mind, let’s take a look at 3 common furnace repairs.

Faulty Thermocouple

Though more modern furnaces have begun using electric intermittent ignition systems, the traditional gas-powered pilot light is still in widespread use. A gas-powered pilot light is controlled by a part called a “thermocouple,” which regulates when to feed gas to the flame. When the pilot flame is lit, the thermocouple produces an electrical current that opens the gas valve and feeds the flame. When the pilot light goes out, the thermocouple’s electrical current stops and the gas valve closes as a safety measure. A faulty thermocouple is one that has lost the ability to keep the gas valve open, smothering the flame for want of fuel. The usual fix for this is to replace the thermocouple completely.

Short-Cycling

Short-cycling is the name for when your furnace won’t stop turning itself on and off over and over again. It is caused by the furnace’s interaction with a part called the “limit switch.” The limit switch is there to make sure the furnace doesn’t overheat and damage itself. When it detects an internal furnace temperature that is too high, it shuts down the furnace as a safety measure. This doesn’t solve the source of the overheating problem, though, and as soon as the furnace starts up again it will repeat the same cycle. A professional will need to isolate the cause of the overheating problem to solve the short-cycling.

Duct Leaks

Duct leaks are an especially insidious problem, because they are almost impossible for a homeowner to detect but can cause thousands of dollars of wasted energy. Almost 30% of an average furnace’s heat is lost to leaks in the ducts, according to the US Department of Energy. The only way to solve this is to have a professional examine and seal the home’s ductwork.

If you’re having furnace problems, call Clean Air Act. We provide furnace repair throughout Beavercreek.

How Do I Know If I Need a Furnace Repair?

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Furnaces have long been one of the most popular home heating system options, and for very good reason. Modern furnaces are very effective, extremely efficient and very durable, allowing them to heat your home reliably and affordably over the course of their long lifespan. Of course, as is the case with any home heating system, you will eventually find that you need to contact a Portland furnace repair technician. When that time comes, call the furnace repair pros at The Clean Air Act, Inc. Our professional Portland, OR furnace repair specialists will have your furnace up and running at maximum performance levels again in no time.

Generally speaking, problems with your furnace are only going to get worse over time. That is why it is so important that you schedule any necessary Portland, OR furnace repair as soon as you suspect a problem with your system. In order to do so, though, you must recognize the warning signs that furnace repair is necessary.

Any general decline in the performance of your home heating system may indicate the need for furnace repair. Uneven heating may be the result of a problem with the fan in your furnace, or even your ductwork. Insufficient heating output may be a sign of a problem with your heat exchanger. Any problem can do serious damage over time, so contact us the moment you discover a problem with your furnace.

You should also call a Portland heating technician if you notice an increase in the cost of heating your home. If you have not made any big adjustments to your heating habits then there should be no major fluctuations in your heating costs. Should the cost of heating your home suddenly spike, it is very likely that there is an underlying problem causing this inefficiency. Schedule repair service immediately.

Your comfort is too important to take any chances with. Contact The Clean Air Act, Inc. if you suspect a problem with your heating system. Our team of Portland, OR furnace repair technicians will help protect your comfort throughout the heating season.

How to Fix a Faulty Furnace Blower

Monday, December 5th, 2011

The blower fan on your furnace is designed to distribute warm air through the ductwork in your Troutdale home evenly, ensuring you use all of the energy consumed by your furnace. If the blower doesn’t turn on when the furnace turns on or it continues to run when the furnace is off, it can cost you money and result in cold rooms. Here are some tips on how to fix a faulty furnace blower.

What is the Problem?

First, check to see what the problem is. If your furnace blower remains on all of the time, it may be a thermostat issue. Make sure the fan isn’t set to stay on continuously (a common setting for most air handlers). You should also check the limit control switch to make sure it is working properly. If this is broken, it needs to be replaced which is a relatively simple fix.

If the furnace blower isn’t turning on at all, you may have a belt problem. This can be fixed by you if you have the proper tools. To repair the belt problem, first turn off all electricity to the device. You’ll need to remove the old furnace blower belt, so release the tension in the pulleys before removing the belt.

Installing a new belt is not unlike doing so for your car. Make sure to check the blower or your user manual for proper tension when you install the new belt. Make sure you purchase the right size belt and set it to the right tension. If you cannot or you do not feel comfortable doing so, you should call a professional to inspect and repair the problem for you.

Getting the Blower Back Up and Running

Once your new belt is in place, test the system carefully, starting with the lowest setting (if there are variable settings). If it does not yet work or if something sounds strange, call a technician right away. You don’t want the motor to burn out or something else more substantial to go wrong with your furnace or air handler during the middle of the winter.

What to Do if Your Heating System Breaks

Monday, November 21st, 2011

What if the heart of your Oregon City home’s heating system – the furnace – stops working? The warm air that used to flow from your vents has been replaced by a chilly draft. It isn’t time to panic, but it is time to take action. Before you do anything, determine why the furnace stopped working. It may be something as simple as a tripped circuit breaker in your electrical panel. Check the circuit breakers first.

The pilot light in your furnace may have blown out. It can be re-lit if you follow the directions in your furnace owner’s manual. You can find answers on how to re-light a pilot light on the Internet, too.

If the shutdown has not been caused by an electrical or pilot light failure, there is still no need to panic. But another obvious question is: did you pay your last gas bill? Maybe you had a shutoff notice and either ignored it or forgot about it.

Now that you are convinced that the furnace has pooped out, here are some things you should do. First, find the name of a qualified heating and cooling professional. If you already use a heating contractor, contact them and schedule a service call.

While you are waiting for help to arrive, ensure that everyone is safe and accounted for. Make sure pets are nearby and protected from the cold, too. What you don’t want to do is use any appliance to keep you warm that is not designed to keep you warm, like a stove. If you have electric space heaters or propane heaters, carefully locate them in a well vented room (windows open a bit or portable fans circulating air). You don’t want any build-up of gases from fossil burning appliances, gases which could contain deadly carbon monoxide.

Huddle up everyone into a room and break out lots of blankets. You may even want to make an “adventure” of this – find a movie to watch and pop up a bunch of popcorn.  If your waiting time is more than 24 hours, you might want to call up a friend or relative and make arrangements to spend the night with them.

The main thing to remember is not to panic. Most qualified heating contractors, knowing the circumstances, will send out a repair person in a matter of minutes or within one or two hours. Just remember to avoid keeping warm by using unvented heating devices.

Common Furnace Problems

Friday, October 14th, 2011

When it comes to your Colton home’s furnace, you simply want it to work all of the time. But just like any other piece of equipment, your furnace will have problems from time to time. A few of these are relatively simple to fix on your own, but for the most part you’ll need to call in someone to take care of the repairs for you.

However, before you can do that, you’ll need to recognize that a problem exists at all. And the earlier you notice the warning signs, the better off you’ll be. It’s always better to get a furnace problem taken care of right away than to wait until your furnace stops working completely.

It’s also good to remember that quite often the problems you’re having with your furnace are really originating with your thermostat. This is usually welcome news, as thermostats are much cheaper and easier to repair and replace than many other parts of your furnace. In fact, even if your furnace isn’t working at all, it may only be the result of a faulty thermostat.

Another problem you may start to notice is that one part of your house is being warmed more than another part. When this happens, it can be a sign that there is something wrong with the furnace, but it may also be that the pressure in your duct system is not balanced properly. A simple rebalancing of this system can have your house heating evenly again in no time.

You may also realize that your furnace seems to be cycling on and off too often. When a furnace is working properly, it will come on for a considerable period of time and then shut off until the temperature in the house drops below the desired level. However, some problems can cause your furnace to complete many short cycles rather than fewer short ones.

If this is happening to your furnace, there are several possible causes. Something might be wrong with the blower on the furnace or the thermostat might not be feeding the furnace the correct information. Another possibility is that your furnace’s air filter is dirty or clogged.

While there are sometimes simple and straightforward solutions to these types of common furnace problems, it’s best to call in a professional to have them take a look if you’re not sure where to start searching for a problem. In most cases you’ll need them to come out and make the necessary repairs anyway.